Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Artist Profile: Deborah Boschert

Deborah Boschert
Lewisville, Texas

1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you? Years ago, I would have been intimidated by the large size. When I was first invited to submit to D@8 exhibits, I took on the challenge to work larger. Seven years later, my skills and confidence have improved and I enjoy creating larger work. 

2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it? My studio table was a wedding gift made by my husband’s cousin. It’s big and sturdy. I’ve raised it to standing height and it’s in the middle of my room. The best thing is that I can walk all the way around it and set up mini work areas for different tasks.

3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? I challenged myself not to fill in every detail. There is more negative space in this quilt than in most of my work. There are still lots of layers and details, but I’m exploring “less.”

4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it? I look at other artwork I really like and I try to find just one small detail that I could explore in my own work. It might be how an artist outlines a shape. Or an unexpected color combination. Or an interesting pattern of lines. 

5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time? I try to have one project in the “thinking” stage, one in the “composing” stage and one in the “stitching” phase.

6. What do you hope people take away from your work? I hope they notice the layers of details and think about how the big things and the small things works together.. in art and in life. 

7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt:  What are your least favorite parts? I try to enjoy the whole process. Even the challenging parts can generate that good feeling of productivity and accomplishment. The things I really don’t enjoy like piecing, measuring and dying… I just don’t do those anymore.

8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to? Dallas Area Fiber Artists, Visual Arts Society of Texas, Quilters Guild of Dallas, Studio Art Quilt Associates

9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  Why? Blues, greens, purples. These colors feel calm yet full of depth and growth to me. 

10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey? I’m thrilled to be working on an art quilt book for C&T Publishing. I did an Open Studio at Quilt Festival in Houston in 2014 and an editor called me after the event to ask me more about my work and suggested I submit a proposal. It’s definitely and “interesting” milestone! It’s exciting and affirming, but also challenging and complex.

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Artist Profile: Larkin Jean Van Horn

Larkin Jean Van Horn
Whidbey Island, Washington
www.LarkinArt.com

1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you?   I like both the long and skinny format and the square format, but find the narrower format easier on my shoulders when machine quilting.

2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it? I work in what would, in a normal abode, be the formal sunken living room. I have a cutting table and ironing table, both with storage underneath, and two tables that hold my sewing machines and serger.  Depending on what part of the project I am working on, I can do layout on either of the big tables.  I also have two huge sheets of foamcore to use as design walls that I can move around the studio as needed.

3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on?  Primarily the size.  I come out of a garment and embroidery background, and working small seems to suit my desire for a lot of detail in the work. This piece includes some handwork, but in contrast to my usual practice, it is not beadwork but hand couched yarns, which I found very satisfying.

4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it? Generally, getting stuck just means that the idea needs more percolating time.  So I move on to something else that I don't have to think too much about.  For instance, much of my current work has a random fused collage as the base.  Many of them are monochromatic, and can be laid out and fused without overthinking it.  Meanwhile, I can let my subconscious mull over whatever the design problem might be.

5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time? I generally start several pieces at once.  I recently had the use of a large studio away from home, and managed to lay out and fuse about 20 collage backgrounds during my days there.  Several of them are almost as large as the piece for this exhibit.  Whichever grabs my attention next will be what I work on.  Eventually they will all get finished, but I am in no rush.

6. What do you hope people take away from your work? Each piece is different, and will convey its own message.  I hope to convey something of the beauty of nature, and a sense of calm.  The world has its own problems, and I see no reason to contribute to them by jangling the nerves of the viewers.

7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt:  What are your least favorite parts? I love working with color to convey my thoughts, and have done extensive research into the symbolism of color.  I try to be thoughtful in my color choices, but sometimes it's just a joy to move the fabrics around until they start to sing. Least favorite things would be the uninteresting stuff like adding labels, hanging sleeves, binding, etc., and I tend to pile quilts up until I have several that need all the final touches and then spend a day or two just doing the boring bits.

8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to? Studio Art Quilt Associates, Whidbey Island Surface Design, Northwest Designer Craftsmen.

9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  Why? I admit to being pulled to the cool side of the color wheel, but I have never met a color I couldn't use for one thing or another.  I find I am more interested in deep, rich, fully saturated colors than in pastels.

10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey? Being invited to create six ensembles for the Fairfield/Bernina Fashion Shows, and getting confirmation for my belief that quilts don't have to be bed sized. (Thank You, Karey Bresenhan, for the Journal Quilt Project!)

Monday, September 28, 2015

Artist Profile: Andi Perejda

Andi Perejda
Arroyo Grande, CA

1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you?  Or if this is your first time with us, how did you like the size? The forty-inch-square format is one in which I frequently work.   It provides enough area to present a sense of depth on a 2-dimensional surface.
2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it? My design area is an eight foot square wall and my work space is the extension on my sewing table.  While working on the wall, I am able to step back to look at design choices and to take snapshots. I wish I had more work table space.
3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? I created the fabric and the basis of the design for We Are Stardust using an ice dyeing technique.  To draw the viewer’s eye into the stellar nursery, I added carefully placed embellishments such as illusion, angelina fibers, beads and pearls.  It is a new piece in a series I have made that are inspired by Hubble or Cassini photos in space. 
4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it? I overcome design blocks by stepping away from the work for a time.  Somehow, in the back of my mind, ideas seem to formulate themselves on ways to take the next step! 
5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time? I frequently work on more than one piece at a time.  Cross-pollination of ideas and techniques to use while doing this are useful.
6. What do you hope people take away from your work? I hope my work inspires a sense of the small size of man’s place in the universe.  The vastness of space and the elements from which life evolved are truly incredible.  There is so much to learn.
7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt:  What are your least favorite parts? I enjoy dyeing and printing on fabrics in a variety of ways.  The difficult part is always deciding what to include, how much to include and when to stop!
8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to? I am a member of SAQA, Northern and Southern California, Fibervision in Goleta, CA and also the Cutting Edge group in San Luis Obispo, CA.
9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  Why? I don’t prefer one color palette over another.  I enjoy seeing how colors affect one another when placed together.  I do find that, over time, I tend to work with certain colors.  Mood and age probably play into these preferences.
10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey? Since my work is not limited to art quilts, I try to incorporate my quilt-making skills into my art pieces.  I do return to making quilts from time to time, as the process I use is mostly handwork.  The most notable encouragement I have had in creating fabric art was winning First Place in Art Quilt, Naturescapes at IQF in 2005.  That piece, Branching Out, then travelled to Lyon, France for Quilt Expo and was a finalist in the $100K Quilting Challenge in 2007.

Friday, September 25, 2015

Artist Profile: Sandra Lauterbach

Sandra E. Lauterbach
Los Angeles, CA
www.sandralauterbach.com           

1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you?  Or if this is your first time with us, how did you like the size? The size worked fine.  My larger pieces are usually rectangular in shape.  As this was a square, I had to think differently about the composition.

2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it? Its size and lighting!  We enlarged my son’s old bedroom for my studio and I spent a lot of time working on the floor plan and lighting. My design space is well lit with color correct bulbs.  My worktable is large and at a good height for cutting and ironing.

3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? “3 ‘Cans” was a switch from my current abstract work of collaging and thread painting on a solid background.  Working with lots of bright printed fabrics was fun.  I smile when I look at the three toucans.

4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it? I find it helpful to take photos of the piece.  It allows me to step back and look at it more objectively.  If that does not give me inspiration, I pin the piece on my design wall and work on something else that day.  Just leaving the piece overnight often results in new creative inspiration when I enter my studio the next day.

5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time? Usually I prefer to work on one piece at a time.  I am not a good multi-tasker.  But sometimes I enjoy working on two totally different types of pieces at the same time. 

6. What do you hope people take away from your work? As in a good story, I hope the viewer is drawn in and intrigued to investigate the piece further and to develop his or her own individual story.  Viewers are necessary to complete my work.  Speaking specifically about “3 ‘Cans”, I hope it brings a smile to its viewers’ faces.

7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt:  What are your least favorite parts? I love the limitless creative exploration possibilities. I am enthralled by the ability to explore various means of communication and expression combining fiber, paints, metal and photography.  The best part is when everything—my idea, colors, composition, etc.-- comes together seamlessly, almost intuitively.  The frustrating part is when I know it doesn’t work, but can’t figure out what to do. I prefer creating the top to the actual quilting unless it is a major component of the piece.       

8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to?  Studio Art Quilt Associates, International Quilt Association, Westside Quilters Guild, The Textile and Fiber Artist List (“TAFA”), Fiber Fanatics, and the Los Angeles Art Association/Gallery 825.

9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  Why?  I am drawn to vibrant bright colors.  Perhaps this is a result of being a California native and used to sunshine!   Or perhaps because I was exposed to lots of colorful prints via the family business—Alexander Henry Fabrics.

10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey?  I started quilting using patterns, but quickly realized that I had an untraditional sense of color, loved to combine unusual prints together and got bored following repetitive patterns.  So one milestone was recognizing this and creating my own designs. Viewing myself as an artist creating art and realizing that quilting had changed from being a hobby to being my vocation was another major step that lead to joining professional organizations and new exhibition opportunities.  Other major milestones have been: joining SAQA, having work at the IQF in Houston, and exhibiting in fine art galleries. Fun milestones were making my first sales!

Thursday, September 24, 2015

Artist Profile: Susan Fletcher King

Susan Fletcher King

Houston, Texas



1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you? Yes, it did.  I was so completely in love with the strong vertical that it took me quite a while to start visualizing things in a square format.



2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it? I have a very small studio and it is definitely a multi-tasking space.  My design table is also my sewing table and my painting table.  I love that everything is within reach.  If the work gets too large for that space, I commandeer the dining room table and use it for the duration.  I try not to schedule any formal dinners while the project is all splayed out in my dining room!



3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? The bar for this show is constantly being raised higher and I rely on the quilt to tell me what it wants and needs.  This quilt never spoke to me and it was a very lonely project riddled with a lot of anxiety because I had to do it “solo”.  



4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it?  I will usually turn my attention to another project until I have resolved the issues that got me stuck.  My brain is still churning over the issue(s), but it is on a semi-conscious level and my conscious brain is focused on something else.  Kind of like switching channels for a while.



5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time?  I will try and rotate through a number of projects.  As one speaks to me with the loudest voice, it becomes the one I must work on.  When that voice is quiet, another project speaks up and I turn my attention to it.  Sometimes I may work on multiple projects as they all are calling for my attention.



6. What do you hope people take away from your work?  I am always gratified when people have that light bulb moment and really see that a quilt doesn’t have to be on the bed.



7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt: The best parts of working are when the design in my mind actually matches what I have physically created.  The other best part if I get an auditory response to my work like a gasp or exclamation.   What are your least favorite parts?  What I call “wardrobe malfunctions” – specifically when some process doesn’t go the way I had hoped or anticipated and I have to figure out a new solution – usually very quickly!



8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to? I am a member of SAQA, the Quilt Guild of Greater Houston and also two small fiber groups also in Houston.



9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  My initial go to is always on the blue and violet side of the spectrum.  Why? I was born that way???



10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey?  Recognizing that a condition which I have called Synesthesia is actually important in my art.  More and more, I am trying to incorporate that valuable “extra perception” in my work.


Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Artist Profile: Cathie Hoover

Cathie Hoover 
Modesto, CA
www.cathiehooverstudios.com
1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you? No, actually the Reflections dimensions (24 x 60) was more of a challenge. This exhibits size offered an opportunity to really explore my concept. 

2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it? My worktable is a 4' wide, 8' long "cutting" table with a cork top. I copied it from Yvonne Porcella's studio. I love the enormous size of it! I can cut, pin, baste and paint on top of it!

3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? Working from your challenge topic is what makes it exciting to me. I spent months trying to come up with a concept, but "Affinity" is a very broad topic; however, when I saw the red barn behind a vineyard full of spring growth, I knew my subject instantly.

4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it? I need time to deal with design blocks. And, these blocks deal with the newness of the design challenge - maybe I don't have the right fabric, or don't feel I can execute what I am trying to do. I love to shop and think about the problem! Then I return home and tackle the "block."

5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time? I concentrate on one textile project at a time. I have recently become interested in painting with watercolors and using acrylic  ink on fabric. I just hosted a 2-day workshop at my home with Judy Coates-Perez on the use of these inks.

6. What do you hope people take away from your work? To be able to appreciate the beauty of a vineyard in the lush of spring growth.

7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt:  What are your least favorite parts? I have only made a few art quilts and they have all been challenging. I am not a process person; I am in it to finish. When I hold up my finished work, I can hardly believe I created it!

8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to? I am a member of SAQA, IQA, Quilt Alliance, and a local "Art Focus" group in Modesto, CA.

9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  Why? I am always drawn to the lush colors of floral blooms, but have never truly been a fan of green. This quilt of a vineyard has changed my opinion of green. 

10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey? I have truly enjoyed your Dinner@8 challenges and have seen the most personal artistic growth from participating in two.

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Artist Profile: Linda Teddlie Minton

Linda Teddlie Minton
San Antonio, Texas

1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you? I loved it! As much as I enjoyed the "tall & thin" orientation of the previous years' dimensions, this was a refreshing change for me, and allowed the interpretation of the theme that I chose.

2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it?  My laptop computer in my BCC (Big Comfy Chair) is my primary design area, as I digitally manipulate my photographs. My Dad's old architect's drafting table has become my work table for sketching, painting and dyeing, and I especially love it for its sentimental attachment. 

3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? It's the first time I've created a quilt specifically with humor as the subject rather than as a side element. It's also the first time that text has been an essential part of my artwork.

4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”? How do you overcome it? If I spend too much time on the initial concept, I can sometimes get bogged down in the process, and have to step away for a day or two. If I can't seem to break free of the "bog", I sometimes go ahead and start the project and let it find its own way. Many times, it takes a crazy turn on its own, and in the process becomes something completely different from the original concept ... and that's often a good thing!

5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time? I usually have one large and several small projects going. This keeps my brain nimble and my body loose. I enjoy working in so many different media that it is stimulating to move from one to the other in the same day.

6. What do you hope people take away from your work? I would love it if people see a little bit of themselves in my work. Much of my work may be seen as nostalgic, humorous, emotional, and maybe even a bit sentimental. Social satire may even find its way in from time to time, but only with sneaky subtlety.

7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt:  What are your least favorite parts? I love digital photo manipulation and surface design, and use both in almost all my art quilts. Dyes and paints are my friends even after the top is quilted, and often "save the day" if I'm not quite satisfied with the finished look. My least favorite? Facing a quilt ... I always enjoyed hand-stitching the bindings on traditional quilts, but I really love the look of facings on art quilts, so I bite the bullet and face them.

8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to? FiberVoices, a small art-quilt group.

9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  Why? Like many artists, my preferred palette changes sometimes. I still love the yummy citrus colors of tropical summers, but lately have been drawn to combinations of black/cream/rust. I couldn't in a million years tell you why.

10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey? Attending my first Houston International Quilt Festival many years ago was an eye- and mind-opening experience that started my journey. Purchasing my first longarm quilting machine was the second milestone, but the most important one was being a founding member of the small art quilt group, FiberVoices in 2008. The members of this group have continually nurtured, supported and inspired me through the years that we have been together.

Monday, September 21, 2015

Artist Profile: Rachel King Parris

Rachel King Parris
Birmingham, Alabama


1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you?  I had a hard time because of lack of space on my design table and in the harp of my machine.


2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it? My design area is new and wonderful. Sweet husband remodeled the back of the garage as a studio for me. I have been amazed at how quickly I have filled the space. The only real drawback I have is that my design table is inadequate for a project this size. However that will be remedied as soon as our carpenter friend can fit me into his schedule.


3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? The size of this quilt is way outside my comfort zone. Although my quilts tend to be very personal to me, I felt very deeply connected to the theme of this one.


4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it? I usually consult with friends and mentors online. Also, I try to read blogs and books by quilters who talk about related problems. If all else fails, I just walk away from the project for a while.


5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time? I tend to work one project to completion.


6. What do you hope people take away from your work? I hope people will appreciate my growth as an art quilter. I also hope they can see me in my work.


7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt:  What are your least favorite parts? The best parts are finding inspiration for the starting point. For me, this usually involves looking through photographs, reading poetry, listening to friends talk, even journaling. The next best is when I begin to see the pieces coming together on the design wall. My least favorite parts continue to be forcing a large quantity of fabric through my machine when free motion quilting. Things happen that I can’t see until I get it all smoothed out and then it requires a major fix. The binding continues to be my least favorite part.


8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to? I am a member of International Quilt Association, and The quilt Alliance


9. Do you have a preferred color palette? My first response is almost automatic: purples, and pinks. However, I have enough work to look back on now, and really I seem to use a lot of blues, yellows, browns and greens. I love color and am trying to pay closer attention now to selecting palettes.  

 
10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey? My most interesting milestones so far have been discovering the world of the IQF in Houston and finding an ever-growing circle of just amazing friends. My Second “milestone” would be the making of my quilt, The Ordinary Day. It was the first time I ever felt like I had actually gotten it right. It was very affirming to me.

Friday, September 18, 2015

Artist Profile: Loris Bogue


Loris Bogue
Simi Valley, California
www.lorisbogue.com
1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you?  I enjoyed the size change.  It didn't present any challenges for me.


2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it? Years ago I sold a collection of blue Wedgwood Jasperware my aunt left me and used the proceeds to buy a large cutting table with drawers and folding leaves.  The best part is the height and surface area, and the fact that I can fold the leaves down if I need to.  I also have a large piece of flannel-covered insulation as a design wall.

3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? I've been taking art classes recently, so I used paint on this quilt, something I hope to do more of in the future.

4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it? To get over a block, I look through my digital photographs for inspiration.  Or for a themed exhibit such as this one, I might search the Internet for ideas related to the definition of the theme.

5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time?  I work on a single project at a time; however I do have an inventory of unfinished pieces!

6. What do you hope people take away from your work?  I hope that people remember our Founding Fathers and the sacrifices they made in order to form a new country.

7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt:  What are your least favorite parts? The best part for me is trying to incorporate a novel technique into my artwork, or to let a technique inspire an idea.  My least favorite part is adding a label and a sleeve!

8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to?  Studio Art Quilt Associates (SAQA) and a group of eight women who meet six times a year to share our art and art quilts.

9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  Why?  I love green.  There are more variations of green than any other color.  That's probably why I love it.

10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey? Whenever my work is in a show; that's a milestone!

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Artist Profile: Julie Schlueter

Julie Schlueter
Orange, CA 

1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you?  I like square quilts and I like working in this size.  It was refreshing.


2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it? It’s cramped so it tends to get messy.  I move to another part of the house, like the kitchen table or TV room floor, and I have the space and elbow room to design, stand back and look, and design some more.

3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? The extreme amount of handwork.  The inside piece is all done by hand and the surrounding area is all done by machine.

4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it? Take a photo and either rework it, add to it or scrap it.  Once in a while I will pick something up I have scrapped and keep going.

5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time? Multiple.  It is easy on the brain to move around and work on other areas of design or fabric manipulation or stitch.

6. What do you hope people take away from your work? A creative outlook.  I am moved to create by seeing others’ work.

7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt:  What are your least favorite parts? I love, love fabric and all things fiber.  Whatever I do, it will have some form of fiber and/or stitch within it.  Least favorite part is the amount of time involved. Carrying out the design can get overwhelming, but I am so thankful when I see the finished product.

8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to? None at the moment.  I am starting a 2-D art class at the end of August so that will keep me busy and advance my fiber design.  I stay in touch with the artists that I used to be in a group with.  They spur me on and inspire me.

9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  Why?  I tend toward the red, yellow, green analogous colors, but some of my fiber art pieces have the full color wheel.  I seem to be attracted to the red, yellow, green palette.  Maybe it’s because I sit in front of many traffic lights in So Cal traffic.

10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey? I think that is coming.  I am excited to learn more about creating art in general, maybe even get a undergrad degree, then go back to learning under a particular masterful fiber artist I admire.

Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Artist Profile: Judy Coates Perez


Judy Coates Perez
Sacramento, CA 
JudyCoatesPerez.com
1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you? I loved the challenge and the aesthetic of long thin format of the earlier exhibits. I haven’t worked in a square format much, so it was an interesting challenge as well.



2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it?  It’s big 4’ x 8’

3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? This piece is a completely different style of work in it’s simplicity. Most of my work over the last 4 years has involved a lot of layering of imagery and multiple techniques on one piece of fabric. This is one layer, without defined imagery and is more about atmosphere and light.

4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it? I don’t focus on it, I do other things, and in most cases, an idea eventually comes to mind on a new way to approach the subject matter.

5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time? Usually one project at I time, if I get distracted and start something new, it’s really hard for me to get back to the other work and finish it. The excitement of new work is too enticing.

6. What do you hope people take away from your work? That changes depending on the work.

7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt:  What are your least favorite parts? The painting/creating the imagery is the best, the finishing work (binding, sleeve and label) is the worst. I don’t like hand sewing.

8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to? SAQA, SDA, IQA

9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  Why?  No, that would be far too limiting. Color expresses mood, and communicates the concept of a work.

10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey? Early on probably winning awards at IQF and PIQF, then being published in magazines and books, getting opportunities to teach abroad, and developing a new direction with my work using acrylic inks over the last 5 years that feels fairly unique. 

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Artist Profile: Cindy Cooksey


Cindy Cooksey
Irvine, California
cookseyville.blogspot.com

1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you?  I had a hard time with the new format. It has been a while since I made art quilts this big, plus I was getting comfortable with the formerly tall and skinny format.

2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it? I need a bigger one.

3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? This quilt required more thought and planning than other recent projects. Other art quilts I've been working on are smaller and more spontaneous. But I am working on a baby quilt that will probably be about the same size as this one.

4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it? Different strategies have worked for me: take a long, thoughtful walk, or clean the art studio, or journal about it, or all of the above.

5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time? Usually multiple projects at the same time. I often have one project in handwork mode, while another is at construction or quilting stage. The deadlines just keep coming, whether official or self imposed.

6. What do you hope people take away from your work? I don't have any control over that, but I love it when my quilts bring a smile or a "wow."

7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt:  What are your least favorite parts? Favorite parts: planning, gathering fabrics and other materials together, doing the handwork usually, and finishing it. Least favorite parts: sleeve, binding, label, doing the handwork if there's too much of it.

8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to? SAQA, Visions, First Friday, Flying Geese Quilters, and of course Dinner at Eight Artists.

9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  Why? I like vivid colors (usually), but I don't think I have one preferred palette now. I love just about every color, depending upon the context!

10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey? Selling my first pattern design to Jukebox in 1995. Going to Quilt Expo in Lyons, France in 1996 to receive a prize. Participating as an artist in Quilt Visions in 2002. Seeing my quilts published in books or magazines whenever it happens.

Monday, September 14, 2015

Artist Profile: Gayle Simpson


Gayle Simpson
El Dorado Hills,CA

1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you?  Previous D@8 vertical rectangles were an easier format, but a square was perfect this year for my Musee d'Orsay clock image.

2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it? I use a pub-style table 36" high with a machine platform of plexiglass and 2x4's at 40" high; both at home and at a family cabin. A Bernina 440QE tops both. 

3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? It was special because I could use photos from a visit to France; I was inspired to create the clock from inside the d'Orsay Museum, and I love Roman numerals and cloc kfaces.

4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it? If I need to, I let a piece "marinate" and work on my other art; then I come back to it. Viewing photos of it, looking at it in reverse in a mirror, or just being patient are all strategies that I use.

5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time?  Multiple, and sometimes a series.

6. What do you hope people take away from your work?  When viewing my work, I hope people see an alternative way of considering the subject matter of the art that I create.

7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt:  What are your least favorite parts? Best; creating a visual representation of something refined in my mind, developing it, using "called-for" techniques, and then translating it into cloth.
Least; repetitive technical sewing, and binding aka "grunt work."

8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to? SAQA, Q6 (a group of 6 artists and we have a 7 week show coming up at Gallery 48 Natoma in fall,2016),Quartz, the Folsom, Quilt and Fiber Guild, and the Crocker Art Museum.

9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  Why?  Yes; I like strong colors, though some of my landscapes require more subtlety. If you look at my art on my web site from the last 35 years, my color choices are consistent. It has always been my style.

10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey?  Milestones for me are receiving awards, being published, and IQF Faculty in 2008, 2009. A "Guest Artist" week at Yosemite, a Yosemite Renaissance cash Award in 2013, starting Artwalk in 1988 (a large suburban continuing outdoor show,) and starting an annual Extreme Quilters show in 2010 are great milestones for my career/journey.Oh wait... and surviving non-smoking lung cancer , a bilobectomy, and Chemo last year.

Friday, September 11, 2015

Artist Profile: Jeannie P. Moore

Jeannie Palmer Moore
Escondido, CA

1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you?  I knew the free-motion quilting on the 40” x 40” would take some time—that’s a BIG quilt to stitch!

2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it? I do most of my design work standing up so the height is the most important thing to me. My worktable is 48” x 36” on the surface and the height is at 37” which makes it comfortable for standing and moving around. My ironing table is at the same height and close by.

3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? I’ve been reproducing representational and interpretive images from my photographs and drawings lately so this quilt was my first improvisational quilt.

4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it? When I get “stuck” it’s usually because I have so many ideas and I have to narrow it down to just a few that will work together. I do a page of thumbnail sketches until I see what will work.

5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time? I work on multiple projects at different stages. I’m experimenting with improvisational designs at the moment between my other quilts. This way I am never bored!

6. What do you hope people take away from your work? I hope people study my quilt and discover all of the surface design techniques I’ve incorporated.

7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt:  What are your least favorite parts? I have to admit my favorite part is designing the quilt. Constructing and stitching it is also enjoyable. My least favorite is the hand-stitching finish work and paperwork.

8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to? SAQA and Modern Quilt Guild

9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  Why? I love Italian gold colors and reds because they make me happy!

10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey? It’s interesting for me to see my quilts travel the world and to many places that I have yet to see.

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Artist Profile: Robbi Joy Eklow

Robbi Joy Eklow
Third Lake, IL  

www.robbieklow.com 

 1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you?  Or if this is your first time with us, how did you like the size? This was the first time with you, and the size was ok. My personal problem was that I used a single piece of fabric as the background of the quilt and the quilt backing and both shrunk up a bit with the quilting. So I had to use a fused binding to hide about a quarter inch gap that would show up once in a while. This is not unusual for me to have this problem, so I should make quilts about 5 inches too big and lop off the extra. (in a well designed fashion of course)

2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table:  what is the best thing about it? My “main” studio is a big bedroom in our house, on the second floor, at the end of the hall. I have a “working wall” which is an 8’ square area covered with bulletin boards made out of a form of homosote, covered with a layer of batting, then insulbrite, (a batting with metal in it to repel heat) and then white fabric. I also have a 30x40 piece of homosote covered with batting and heavy canvas to use as an ironing board. That lives on a corner of one of my sewing cabinets. I have two large sewing cabinets, both with flaps on the back, sitting in my studio as a giant square table. The sewing machines are on electric lifts, so I can easily change the space from sewing to other stuff.

3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? It’s actually a bit smaller than I normally work. I like about 60x60”. I also started using the negative space from some die cuts I’d made with an accuquilt die I designed a few years ago. I tested out a method of machine embroidering the shapes down to the background before sandwiching the quilt and then quilting it.

4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it? I go do something else. I have a lot of ideas. I do have journals and I write in them, so I could actually go back and read. But I rarely do. I think writing things down helps me keep the ideas in my head.

5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time? Multiple, but all at a different phase. For example, I’m designing my next quilt and the one after that. The first one will be more of a study for the second one, but will still be a big quilt, just not as detailed as the second one will be. I am doing some quilting on another quilt and have another ready to start quilting. I’m not in a “fabrication” stage this week.

6. What do you hope people take away from your work? I just want them to enjoy looking at my work. There really isn’t a message, I just like playing with design.

7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt:  What are your least favorite parts? I love using my own dyed fabric. I don’t like having to worry about the edges fraying. Quilts may get a little fuzzy, they aren’t going to fall apart.

8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to? SAQA, PAQA, IQA, AQS, and a small critique group.

9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  yes. Why? I guess I was just born this way.

10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey? Getting into Quilt National back at the turn of the century. Literally going to New Zealand three times, and Australia once, parts of Canada, and Switzerland. I feel very lucky to have traveled that much just with quilting. I’ve gone to London, Paris, Milan, Rome and Florence with my husband though and I have to say, I love traveling with him the best. I’ve written two books, have a Craftsy class and have won some awards, so they are all milestones.

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Artist Profile: Susan Brubaker Knapp


Susan Brubaker Knapp
Mooresville, NC


1. Did the change in dimensions present any specific challenges for you?  I liked the square format. I find being “forced” to adapt to different sizes and shapes encourages my creativity. 

2. Describe your design area, specifically your work table: what is the best thing about it? I work in a small (former) guest bedroom in my house. I got my work table at Pier One; it is a banquet-height scratch-and-dent-sale dining table, so it is the perfect height for painting, drawing, cutting and tracing. 


3. What set this quilt apart from other recent projects you have been working on? I’ve been doing a lot of flowers and botanical subjects, so focusing on old wood and paint and rust was a change. 


4. When you get “stuck” how do you deal with a “design block”?  How do you overcome it? I don’t get stuck very often or very long. Working on something different for a while can provide time for ideas to gestate or percolate and for solutions to emerge. 

5. Do you work on single or multiple projects at the same time? I often have 20 or more projects going simultaneously! Deadlines – for exhibitions, publications, etc., – often drive my schedule and determine what gets finished first.  

6. What do you hope people take away from your work? I focus on the really small details of things; there are so many miracles there. I hope to encourage people to look closer and appreciate those things, to look for the beauty around them.

7. What are the best parts of working on an art quilt? What are your least favorite parts? There’s really no part of it that I don’t like. It is a privilege to have the time and materials and ability to create art. 


8. What art/quilt-related organizations do you belong to? Studio Art Quilt Associates, International Quilt Association, American Quilter’s Society


9. Do you have a preferred color palette?  Why? I work mostly in clear, bright colors. I think it’s because I’m an optimist at heart!

10. What do you regard as your most interesting milestones along your art journey? The most recent milestone is having the opportunity to host “Quilting Arts TV.” The experience of being able to see the work of amazing fiber artists close up, and to talk to them about their work is definitely influencing my art.
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