Friday, September 21, 2018

Artist Profile: Jeannie P. Moore

Jeannie P. Moore
Escondido, California
http://www.jpmartist.com/

1. What is sitting on the edges of your work table? Stacks of papers of quilt instructions or contracts, a water bottle, rotary cutter, scraps of fabric, roll of tissue paper and a marker.
2. If someone looked beneath the surface, what could be revealed that we might not know about you? I have recently taken up knitting and I’m still not very good at it. Knitting is very relaxing for me and a change from quilting. And I love buying yarn!

3. What occupies the space between your sewing machine and your cutting table? I’m still setting up my new studio but for now it’s a big design wall.

4. What is the most exquisite moment in your artistic life? I love the moment that I learn that my quilt has been accepted into a big show. But more than anything I love having the freedom to design and create everyday in my studio.

5. Do you have daily rituals in your studio? I like having a clean work table so I do straighten it up especially if I’m involved in a big project.

6. Reflecting on the quilts that you have made, which one stands out to you? For my Dinner@8 quilts I think “Milo” is special to me. My black lab and his “ritual” of getting the daily newspaper. And it was especially rewarding to see that quilt displayed in Amsterdam.

7. What do you have an affinity for in your work? I love printing and dyeing my own fabric for my quilts.

8. What kinds of patterns do you use in your work to create interest and texture? I LOVE circles, dots and anything round.

9. What personal iconography is identifiable to you exclusively in your work? Each of my quilts usually has a little or a lot of newspaper transfer.

10. What was your inspiration for the Best of Dinner at Eight? I knew I wanted to do patterns and what better way than using my favorite soy wax printed circle fabric.

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Artist Profile: Stacy Hurt



Stacy Hurt
Orange, CA

1. What is sitting on the edges of your work table? Seam ripper; Metal magnetic tool bowl; magnetic pin cushion. My sewing table is a Steelcase work table 60” x 40” I rescued from our office. Havel Scissors and cup warmer. 
2. If someone looked beneath the surface, what could be revealed that we might not know about you?  I have a lovely and powerful singing voice.  It runs in my family.  
 
3. What occupies the space between your sewing machine and your cutting table? All my hopes and dreams and my Design Wall where they sometimes come true.
4. What is the most exquisite moment in your artistic life? Walking onto the Long Beach quilt floor and seeing my Cheetah quilt in the very front of the show. 
5. Do you have daily rituals in your studio? Loading the latest murder mystery on my audible account, getting the cup of tea on the mug warmer and clearing off the small cutting mat next to my machine. 
6. Reflecting on the quilts that you have made, which one stands out to you? Lift. Painting the Ecstasy of St. Teresa sculpture by Bernini as a base and actually pulling it off better than I ever thought possible.  
7. What do you have an affinity for in your work? My own calligraphy and iconic symbols of Ravens, Serpents and Text.
8. What kinds of patterns do you use in your work to create interest and texture? Patterns of letters. Always pairing the linear with the serpentine to create a balance.
  
9. What personal iconography is identifiable to you exclusively in your work? Calligraphy and Ravens.
10. What was your inspiration for the Best of Dinner at Eight? Exploring the dichotomy of the common weed; sometimes viewed as invader ; poisoned and ripped out without mercy; but (thankfully) more often appreciated as essential to the entire ecosystem.  The parallel between weeds and humans is fascinating. Hope humans can fare as well as these tough little survivors do.

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Artist Profile: Susan Fletcher King

Susan Fletcher King
Houston, Texas

1. What is sitting on the edges of your work table?  Lots of art papers and cutting tools and paints and rulers.

2. If someone looked beneath the surface, what could be revealed that we might not know about you?  I think I come across as flippant and irreverent, but that is a mask hiding a boatload of anxiety, insecurity and stress.

3. What occupies the space between your sewing machine and your cutting table?  It’s all one table and many things overlap from one area to the next including art cloth, threads, paints, scissors, Xacto knives and art papers.  There are no boundaries, much like my work.

4. What is the most exquisite moment in your artistic life?  The day I walked into a quilt shop approximately 15 years ago and saw the rows of batik fabrics and fell down the rabbit hole.  That was the moment I began this journey and I have never looked back.

5. Do you have daily rituals in your studio?  Right now things are in such an upheaval that finding time to get into the studio constitutes its own ritual.

6. Reflecting on the quilts that you have made, which one stands out to you?  My personal favorite (or the one I love to hate) is the D@8 quilt made for the Patterns show.  This piece (a wedge of cabbage) seemed so simple and yet I had so much difficulty conversing with the quilt and literally threw paint at it during one frustrating session. Despite the annoyance and frustration I felt throughout the entire creative process, the quilt eventually worked!

7. What do you have an affinity for in your work?  I like my “critters”.

8. What kinds of patterns do you use in your work to create interest and texture? Painted or dyed or deconstructed backgrounds to create a sense of “regular irregularity”.

9. What personal iconography is identifiable to you exclusively in your work?  In general, my personal iconography is informed by my illustration background in portraying images of birds or insects and amphibians/reptiles, (the critters I referred to in #7).

10. What was your inspiration for the Best of Dinner at Eight?  I found out about my husband’s affair approximately 1 week after the new D@8 show was announced and I immediately knew that I wanted to chronicle and release my emotions in this last D@8 piece.  The difficult part was resolving the quilt while my marriage and home life are still not entirely resolved.
 

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Artist Profile: Ann Turley

Ann Turley
Fallbrook, CA

1. What is sitting on the edges of your work table? Multiple swatches of fabric, a couple of works in progress, tools and embelishments I might someday want to use. If I put it all away, I might never find it again!
 
2. If someone looked beneath the surface, what could be revealed that we might not know about you? Oh my, I am filled with insecurity. Am I good enough to do this, will I be accepted for who I am, will they like my work? 
 
3. What occupies the space between your sewing machine and your cutting table? A trail of loose threads follows me everywhere. But more to the point, ideas develop between these two points. My cutting table is in the garage so the trip between studio and cutting table can become a time to change my mind or solve a problem.  
 
4. What is the most exquisite moment in your artistic life? The first SAQA show I ever gathered the courage to submit to was A Sense of Scale, 2012. I was so stunned when I received the acceptance notice that I was jumping for joy! This was an amazing boost to my confidence, and I felt a bit like Sally Fields - you like me, you really like me!
 
5. Do you have daily rituals in your studio? Open the window to let in the fresh air, evaluate and prioritize what needs to be done. New themes and ideas leap from my brain while I sleep, so the first few minutes are spent writing and sketching. At the end of the day my goal is the leave my studio organized enough so that I can enter in the morning with little to no clutter to hinder me.
 
6. Reflecting on the quilts that you have made, which one stands out to you? Mortie Learns To Read, accepted by Dinner@8 for the Affinity theme. We had recently lost our last beloved basset hound and my husband asked that I create a memorial quilt. The theme was perfect and I envisioned a hound with glasses, surrounded by stacks of books. This quilt now hangs in a special place in my home, and my husband has asked that I never offer it for sale.
 
7. What do you have an affinity for in your work? I love the whole process of creating a pattern, then a quilt from just the spark of an idea. It makes my heart race when the pattern practically draws itself and fabrics all work together.  
 
8. What kinds of patterns do you use in your work to create interest and texture? Circles! I love circles. Just when I think the circle has outlived its usefulness, another design opportunity presents itself and the circles jump in. I use them as both design elements and quilting motifs.  
 
9. What personal iconography is identifiable to you exclusively in your work? Whimsy inspires much of what I do. Most of my work is meant to make you smile, or even laugh out loud. When creating an animal-themed quilt, I work at portraying the unexpected. For example, many of my giraffes wear sunglasses, and Mortie wears reading glasses.   
 
10. What was your inspiration for the Best of Dinner at Eight? A recent tour of Peru brought so much inspiration that I was about to explode by the time we returned home. The Inca were and are a fascinating culture who focus their attention on creating textiles with meaningful patterns and lots of color. Gold meant nothing more than ornamentation to them, but a beautifully woven and embroidered piece was highly valued.

Monday, September 17, 2018

Artist Profile: Wen Redmond



Wen Redmond
Strafford, NH
1. What is sitting on the edges of your work table?‬ My work table has a supplies at the ready, pieces or samples of work and ideas to work.
2. If someone looked beneath the surface, what could be revealed that we might not know about you?‬ I am an introvert. I need time alone to recharge, download and generally re-center myself.
3. What occupies the space between your sewing machine and your cutting table?‬ onothing! I turn to my sewing machine in a lightening second, or a NY minute, when in the flow.
4. What is the most exquisite moment in your artistic life?‬ When the work becomes more than I could conceive of in the planning stages. Working is a meditation for me. I lose myself in it and as I work, plans change, the piece dialogues with my sub-conscious and small celebrations are held within.
5. Do you have daily rituals in your studio?‬ Actually, no. I seem to work seasonally. I do the actual work mostly in the winter here in the cold blue north. Planning and inspiration seems to take place daily, whether I want it to or not.
6. Reflecting on the quilts that you have made, which one stands out to you?‬ Pieces that speak to me generally are more personal. It could be a inspiration from a favorite walk, a photograph of home or near to loved ones, sometimes even a construction technique I enjoy fully.
7. What do you have an affinity for in your work?‬ Experimentation! Without a doubt! When I was writing my book, Digital Fiber, I would make a sample and immediately get an idea for another sample. I had gobs of materials to send my publisher.
8. What kinds of patterns do you use in your work to create interest and texture? ‬Texture itself speaks to me. Textures created with mixed media materials can be printed digitally with the use of an digital ground, used as a transfer base or it can create a background for an digitally printed silk organza photo overlay, as in my piece, Layers of Meaning.
9. What personal iconography is identifiable to you exclusively in your work?‬ I think photography. Photography has spoken to me for decades. When I was able to use my photography to create digital fiber works, my work exploded. Presently, I either manipulate images using a variety of digital tools or create unique substrates to print on or over-lay which influences the final image in a physical way.
10. What was your inspiration for the Best of Dinner at Eight?‬ A solitary boat slides across a bloom of Queen Ann’s Lace viva a hand created digital photo. The boat is the heart of the piece while the shoots of the flower direct the creative energy beyond and outward.

Friday, September 14, 2018

Artist Profile: Karol Kusmaul

Karol Kusmaul
Inverness, FL


1. What is sitting on the edges of your work table?  Cloth in Common project – nude challenge – customer quilts – writing assignments – Power of Women project – various UFO’s – pins (lots of pins)

2. If someone looked beneath the surface, what could be revealed that we might not know about you? I’m competitive and impatient.  I love to sing, but not in public!

3. What occupies the space between your sewing machine and your cutting table? A 12 foot APQS Millennium, 7 carts of fabrics,  and several cases of batting.

4. What is the most exquisite moment in your artistic life? Launching Cloth in Common last summer!!  We are an international group of eleven fiber artists.  We respond to bimonthly prompts and display our results on a blog at www.clothincommon.com  

5. Do you have daily rituals in your studio? Each studio visit is unique.  I do verbally thank my machines – Hope and Faith – each time I unplug them for the day.

6. Reflecting on the quilts that you have made, which one stands out to you?  The king size quilt I made with fabrics purchased in Paris.  It’s my longarm masterpiece, so far.  We sleep under it in the winter.

7. What do you have an affinity for in your work?  Starting a new collage piece, moving parts around and playing with possibilities.  I also love the moment when all the pins come out, and everything is stitched down!!!

8. What kinds of patterns do you use in your work to create interest and texture? All sorts!!!  I use prints from upcycled clothing.  Love to mix multiple patterns!!

9. What personal iconography is identifiable to you exclusively in your work?  See #8 above.  Also the fact that I draw with my scissors.  I rarely sketch first.  No pattern pieces.  I collage with raw edge prints and hand applique the shapes to a background with a ladder stitch.

10. What was your inspiration for the Best of Dinner at Eight?  On a fiber artists’ tour of Japan, I came upon this scene on my own during an early morning walk around the neighborhood.  It was thrilling and surreal to me, just to be there.

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Artist Profile: Cathie Hoover

Cathie I. Hoover
Modesto, CA. 95356

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present for you? Time management was my biggest issue as I am a last minute producer. Our planned trip to Spain for 3 weeks interfered with the deadline; I moved the deadline up and finished early!

2. What is sitting on the edges of your work table? Miscellaneous UFOs that had to be put aside while I worked on my Dinner at Eight entry. 

3. If someone looked beneath the surface, what could be revealed that we might not know about you? That as a child I lived in London for 3 1/2 years and Kenitra, Morocco, Africa. It changed how I appreciated our freedoms and governments in the United States. 

4. What is the most exquisite moment in your artistic life? That moment when I came to realize that my textile work was appreciated by my peers and the public.

5. Do you have daily rituals in your studio? I really do not think I have any daily rituals, although my husband says that I read the local and national newspapers for two hours each morning. Maybe my ritual is finding out what is going on in the world before I immerse myself in my studios for hours on end. 

6. Reflecting on the quilts that you have made, which one stands out to you? All four of the quilts I have made for Dinner at Eight special exhibits in Houston I consider to be pivotal pieces. Usually the newest becomes my favorite, but I feel that my TILES quilt was really the best of the four. 

7. What do you have an affinity for in your work? Color, appliqué, and perfection - although perfection is the hardest to achieve. 

8. What kinds of patterns do you use in your work to create interest and texture? This differs from quilt to quilt depending on the subject matter I am dealing with. 

9. What personal iconography is identifiable to you exclusively in your work? I don’t think is have any personal iconography that is identifiable in my work. I prefer to avoid repeating a style or subject matter. 

10. What was your inspiration for the Best of Dinner at Eight? An Exquisite Moment - a favorite memory. The photo of my sister’s dachshund dressed as a clown for a Halloween parade from a newspaper photo taken in 1997. 

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...