Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Dinner at Eight Artists in Houston

We are so happy to finally be in Houston and see our exhibit



Dinner at Eight Artists



Thank you Mistyfuse for sponsoring our exhibit with us!



The exhibit is spread out in the hall - left to right - Rachel Parris, Sherri Mc Cauley, Gerrie Congdon, Valerie White and Susan Brubaker Knapp


Left to right -  d@8, Sue Bleiweiss, Linda Anderson, Rachel Parris, Sherri McCauley



Left to right - Heather Pregger, Hope Wilmarth and Lyric Kinard



Left to right -  Martha Wolfe and Jane Dunnewold 



Left to right - Susie Monday, Kristin LaFlamme, and Jeannie Moore



Left to right -  Annie Smith and Cindy Cooksey



Left to right -  Susan Fletcher King and Frances Holliday Alford



Left to right - Jamie Fingal, Leslie Tucker Jenison, Virginia Spiegel, Karol Kusmaul, Kathy York, Sherry Kleinman, Virginia Greaves and Judy Coates Perez 

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Everything Houston!

Every year, we try to highlight our artists. This year is no different. If you are planning to attend Quilt Market or even Quilt Festival in late October, here is a sampling of what our Dinner at Eight Artists will be doing and you can view their work in special exhibits.

Quilt Market
RJR Booth - Leslie Tucker Jenison will have a new line debuting!

World of Beauty
Gossiping Ducks and Hungry Tiger by Linda Anderson
Limbs, Ladders, Roots and Rocks by Deborah Boschert
Carnival by Robbi Eklow
Old Timer by Suzan Engler
Justice & Freedom by Virginia Greaves
Making Coleslaw by Susan Fletcher King
Genevieve by Sherry Kleinman
Birthday book for Elliott by Sherry Kleinman
Resurrection by Susan Brubaker Knapp
Neuron by Hope Wilmarth

Tactile Architecture
Wrightsville Pier by Jeannie P. Moore

Hands all Around
Road Map by Hope Wilmarth
Viewpoints curated by Martha Wolfe
Santa Cruz, Hydrangea, Refelecting and Blue Bell by Martha Wolfe

Open Studios
“Stitch, Paint & Layer Your Next Quilt” with Jeannie P. Moore
Thursday, November 2nd, 4-6pm
Friday, November 3rd, 12-2pm


Gallery Talk of SAQA Exhibitions, Sunday, November 5 at 1 pm with Deborah Boschert

SAQA Booth
Friday morning - Sherri L. McCauley
Deborah Boschert Teaching Schedule
Small Stitched Landscape 478, Thursday, November 2 from 2 to 5 pm
Mixed Media Sampler Creating Original Stencils 556, Friday, November 3 from 10 to noon
All About Art Quilts Lecture 563, Friday, November 3 at 3 pm
Creativi-Tree Art Quilts 711, Saturday, November 4 from 9 am to 5 pm
Techniques with Paint and Ink 801, Sunday, November 5 from 9 am to noon

Robbi Joy Eklow Teaching Schedule
419. FUSAPALOOZA PUMPKIN SPICE LATTE Thurday November 2, 2017 ALL DAY
516. FUSAPALOOZA XXL Friday November 3, 2017 ALL DAY
718. FUSAPALOOZA MINI Saturday November 4, 2017 ALL DAY

Monday, September 18, 2017

Order Personal Iconography: Graffiti On Cloth!

We are pleased to announce the publication of an exhibition catalog for "Personal Iconography:  Graffiti On Cloth"!
Here are the details:
Title ID: 7565470
ISBN-13: 978-1976304040

And the book cover:
Cover art by Judy Coates Perez

Loris Bogue is the editor of this lovely book.  You may order your copy of the catalog here!

If you are so-inclined we would love to have your review on the amazon site.  The reviews elevate the visibility of the publication!  Thanks in advance.   

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Artist Profile: Jamie Fingal, co-curator

Jamie Fingal
Orange, California

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? Oh my, a whole bunch, and I helped come up with this theme. Go figure. I was overthinking it. I could hear Pokey Bolton saying to me KISS - keep it simple stupid. I looked around my studio and a light bulb went off. There is a quilt on the design wall from Quilt Market with my new line that had most of my personal icons on it, so I did the next best thing - I added more to it to create my quilt for d@8. Brilliant!  It's so me!

2. Describe your studio space?  My happy place is in an industrial park and it's basically one giant room like a concrete shoe box with a bathroom, a truck door and two doors in front for great cross ventilation. I can spread out wherever I am working and the best part is that i don't have to clean up. I throw everything on the floor when I work, even paint. Everything is on wheels, so I can move everything around to suit my needs.  

3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? The Visions Quilt Museum in San Diego - "Funny Bone" exhibit - I have four works. Now until, Wisconsin Quilt and Fiberart Museum in Cedarburg, Wisconsin "In Death" exhibit and a piece traveling with Threads of Resistance exhibit. 

4. Do you ever work in a series?  I have in the past, but not so much anymore because I seem to be on the same vibrant color whimsical path as a fabric designer and a contemporary quilter.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy?  I love to garden, grow food and flowers, cook, entertain, be with my family, binge watch tv shows, swim, draw and read.

Monday, September 11, 2017

Artist Profile: Leslie Tucker Jenison

Leslie Tucker Jenison
Co-curator
1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? I had to do a great deal of thinking about what imagery best represents an overall theme in my work.  I settled on shapes that represent both natural and man-made elements.

2. Describe your studio space. I am fortunate to have a newly-renovated studio which includes both design and “wet” work areas inside my home.  I was able to re-think this space in a manner that is very specific to my needs as a contemporary quilt artist and fabric designer.

3. Where can people see your work in the next six months?  Exhibitions include “Threads of Resistance” at the New England Quilt Museum (& traveling), “Your Brightest Life: A Tribute to Yvonne Porcella” as part of “Sacred Threads” (traveling), and the “Personal Iconography:  Graffiti On Cloth” D@8 exhibit.  'In Death' exhibit at the Wisconsin Quilt and Fiberarts Museum. Work will be featured in 2 episodes of “Fresh Quilting”, a PBS show that will air in the coming months.

4.  Do you ever work in a series?  I enjoy working in a series, and have several that tend to be re-visited periodically when I have more information or ideas to contribute.  There are specific challenges that arise from working inside a stated set of parameters.  Sometimes, setting a few limitations is a great way to push the creative envelope.  I find that I have more ideas than “room” inside one piece and that is often how a series begins to take shape.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy? I am an avid traveler, photographer, cook, and gardener.  I always have a book nearby.

Friday, September 8, 2017

Artist Profile: Valerie C. White

Valerie C. White
Denver, Colorado

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? I had several ideas to to express the theme, the challenge was to select just one. I have long admired the work of Jean- Michel Basquiat  this work was my humble attempt to honor him.

2. Describe your studio space? I'm always looking to improve my space,this year I tried to add a stackable washer/dryer, combo the wiring and duct work was just too expensive. I'll continue to use the portable until i can figure out a better solution.
3. Where can people see your work in the next six months?  The summer issue of Art Quilting Studio Magazine, The Lawerence Art Center in  Lawerence,Kansas and the National Center For Atmospheric Research  Boulder , Colorado.
4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? I find working in a series a great opportunity to fully express an idea or subject. For me a series establishes a cohesive body of work. This current exhibit motivated me to consider expressing additional work using written language as a mark making opportunity. I expect to create 5  pieces in this new series in what I'm calling "Conversations about America". 

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy?  I'm an avid knitter and belong to a great knit group, as fiber folks there are always great discussions about yarn, fabric and knitting stitches.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Artist Profile: Suzan Engler

Suzan Engler
Houston, Texas

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? Meeting the challenge and staying true to my personal style was the greatest challenge.
2. Describe your studio space? My studio is my refuge and my happy place.  If it had a refrigerator and restroom I would never leave!
3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? My work is on display at International Quilt Festival Houston, Festival of Quilts - Birmingham, United Kingdom, The Texas Quilt Museum, and the Copper Shade Tree Gallery, Round Top, Texas,  where my work is featured in the Changing Gears exhibit.

4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist?  I work in a series of series. I single series can become boring to me. 

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy? I strive to do everything with my own brand of creativity. I sew garments, crochet, and paint with watercolor, acrylic, and encaustic.

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Artist Profile: Robbi Joy Eklow

Robbi Joy Eklow
Third Lake, Illinois

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? After exploring several design ideas, I decided to dive into my “leftover bin” and use some parts from other quilts as a starting point. I found the lovely petals and couldn’t remember why I had set them aside. I worked with them and did remember the stumbling block but I was already moving in another direction. The leafy border on the outside edge was also a good solution to a problem I was having with the space outside the flower.

2. Describe your studio space?  I use one bedroom in my home in Illinois for my “dry studio” (domestic machines, fabric storage, ironing, working wall) and another bedroom for storage of my quilts. And part of the basement holds my APQS Millennium longarm. We are leasing a loft in Omaha, in the Market District and I’m moving into studio space at the Hotshops. I think my longarm and other machines will move there, so I can use it and teach classes there. My small studio in our loft is just the second bedroom, but it has an amazing view out the window, a lagoon, with modern sculptures, and a waterfall. It’s wonderful and I think it will give me some design ideas. The Hotshops space will also be fun, there are lots of other artists there. It’s not so far from the Quilt Museum in Lincoln.

4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? I have been working in a series for over 15 years, I can’t remember which year I started. I keep exploring other ideas and then fall back to the series, to solve a problem in the next quilt, that I couldn’t in the last. I feel like I’ll stay in this series until I have it perfected. Then maybe one more. My last series was of quilts that had a lot of overlapping and transparent images of vases and other vessels.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy? My husband and I got a sailboat a few years ago, a 1985 Pearson 303. It’s small, and old, but it’s a beautifully crafted boat. The Pearson brothers literally started building fiberglass boats in their garage. Remind you of anyone? Anyway, we love the boat and sailing on Lake Michigan, from Waukegan harbor. It’s very good to get out there and just sit on the deck by the mast and look at the water rush by. I come home with ideas.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Artist Profile: Virginia Greaves

Virginia Greaves
Roswell, Georgia

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? The majority of my work is in portraits, so when I received the theme for this show, I was perplexed. In order to create a portrait with iconography, the best interpretation that I could find was through tattoos. I have a family member with several, and she puts a lot of thought into each one, In reality, they are little windows into her personality. I do not have tattoos, but if I were to get one, I would probably get a raven, which is on the arm, and the moon was added for balance. I felt that the piece needed the balance of it on the upper back near the shoulder. Models are often an issue, and I am always available, so this is a self-portrait. The graffiti in the background was a nice rounding out of the theme, and it added to the personality of the piece to have it in the background.

2. Describe your studio space? My studio space is in a large room in my house. It has a lot of natural light with two large windows. There is a bookcase for books, one table for extra sewing machines, and another table for cutting. I have a large craft table in the middle of the room that can fold into a small space or be expanded. It has a cover for ironing when I’m working with large pieces. In the back window, I have my Janome sewing machine in a Koala cabinet. Directly behind it, I have an ironing board with a large, padded piece of plywood to expand the ironing area. When I’m quilting a large piece, I bring one of the height adjustable tables over and put it behind the ironing board, and I put the other one to the left of where I’m sitting. I have a closet where my older work is stored and my fabric is stashed.

3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? I have a piece in IQA’s World of Beauty exhibit in Houston October/November. I also curate a local exhibit at an art gallery in Marietta, GA, The Art Place, and will have work included in that show September 7th-29th. I have a piece that will be highlighted in the September/October edition of Machine Quilting Unlimited, I have an interview in Art Quilt Collector issue 8 that will be available in late August, and I wrote an article that will be in Be Creative that will be available in late January 2018.

4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? I have been making portraits of people and animals since 2006. It has been a tremendous learning journey as I have learned how to refine my skills, and each new piece teaches me something new. I have reached a point that I’m comfortable portraying an accurate representation of a person in fiber, and I’m now exploring the finer points of portraiture, the things that make a portrait successful, such as posture, facial expression, composition, background, and accessories.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy?  I enjoy photography, and my Instagram account shows a fascination with landscapes, sunrises/sunsets, and cloud formations that are very different from the portraiture that I explore in fiber.

Monday, September 4, 2017

Artist Profile: Sherry Davis Kleinman

Sherry Davis Kleinman
Pacific Palisades, California

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you?  I found the theme a challenging one to settle on an idea.  Thinking about the act of “making marks” as the basis for my art, I followed that path to create my Sampler Reimagined.  Historically needlework samplers were created by girls and women to learn and express themselves.  I wanted to create a 21st century sampler using alternate materials (recycled black out curtains) and making untraditional marks with traditional hand stitches to create a personal piece of art.  
 
2. Describe your studio space?  My studio is on the ground floor of my home with a big window looking onto the street, formerly a bedroom for my oldest daughter.  I do use other spaces in the house (mainly my dining room) for cutting and ironing.  Being empty nesters, my husband and I do fill up any empty spaces with our current past-times.  Lucky us!
 
3. Where can people see your work in the next six months?  I have a piece in New Legacies:  Contemporary Art Quilts in Ft. Collins, Colorado until end of August.  In addition to Dinner@8 exhibit at the Quilt Festival, I have 2 pieces juried into the World of Beauty.  I am in 2 episodes of Quilting Arts TV Series 2000 (10th anniversary edition) and 1 episode in Series 2100 in January 2018, both featured on PBS stations and for purchase through Quilting Arts TV.

4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist?  Yes working in a series is a benefit to me creatively; one project builds upon the previous one.  I have created series that are figurative and bird related in recent years.  Currently I am  exploring creating pieced and stitched canvas, abstract painting, and leaving exposed seamed edges on the RIGHT side.  My Sampler Reimagined is the 3rd in my series.
 
5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy?  I read blogs (textile, art, sculpture—really anything art related) and visit galleries and museums.  My 3 adult daughters are all artists and we often inspire each other’s passions, a cross pollination of sorts.  I am part of a textile group who meet monthly for “show and tell” and lunch in each other’s homes.  

Friday, September 1, 2017

Artist Profile: Deborah Boschert

Deborah Boschert
Lewisville, Texas

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you?
I was excited about the theme from the moment I heard it! I love working with iconography, which I often call personal symbols. The biggest challenge was that part of me wanted to make another bowl quilt -- my last two Dinner at Eight art quilts have included bowls, but I couldn't get the ladder out of my mind, so this year's Dinner at Eight include several ladders, but no bowl. 
2. Describe your studio space? I work in what is designed to be a den or office in our home. It's right off the front entryway behind French doors, which is great for mostly hiding the creative chaos often happening within. I have a small sewing area in one corner. If I'm working on a larger quilt, I move my machine out onto the dining room table. I have two tall shelves with materials, tools and supplies organized in plastic shoe boxes. A counter height table (originally made by my husband's cousin for us as a wedding gift) is my main work surface. There's a red love seat that I often share with my dog, Lincoln.
3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? In addition to my Dinner at Eight quilt, I have two other quilts at Festival in Houston: one in the judged show and one in the special exhibit A Matter of Time Textiles. You can see me and lots of my quilts at Craft Napa in January and I send out a newsletter twice a month that always includes new work. Sign up here. http://eepurl.com/jU1n9
4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? I suppose you could say I work in a series. I feel more like I work in my own personal style and that my body of work includes many materials, techniques, colors and symbols that make it clear it's all made by me. I've recently been creating pairs of quilts using the positive and negative shapes cut from one piece of fabric. This is a new direction that feels much more like exploring the idea of a series.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy? I don't really have other hobbies that are particularly creative, but I have lots of hobbies that generate inspiration that I bring back to the studio. I love to travel and take photographs. I love listening to podcasts about interesting people doing interesting things. I like to explore the children's book section at my local library looking for innovative, humorous and beautiful artwork.

Thursday, August 31, 2017

Artist Profile: Kristin La Flamme

Kristin La Flamme
Portland, Oregon
1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? With room for such broad interpretation, I had to consider which direction would be most authentic for me -- did I want to focus on the graffiti aspect, or the personal aspect? I suppose setting myself the parameters of using only materials and themes I have used before could be considered a challenge, but to me it was the driving force of the piece. I enjoy the puzzle of making do with what I have at hand.

2. Describe your studio space? I work in what was intended as a "Family Room." It's large enough for me to have storage shelves, tables for both my sewing machine and my computer, plus a large cutting table/work area. The best part is that it's a dedicated studio space and I don't need to clear out when guests arrive or dinner is ready.

3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? My tessellated gun quilt, 'Murica, is on view with Quilt National '15 until October 10, 2017 at the Historical & Cultural Society of Clay County, Moorhead, MN; "Death Shroud for Democracy" is on tour with SAQA's Layered Voices exhibit and will next be at Oklahoma State University Museum of Art, Stillwater, OK, May 1- August 18, 2018. The Gallery tab on my website is always a good place to look for the widest range of my work: https://kristinlaflamme.com
 
4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? Yes, I usually do work in a series, or at least a pretty straightforward trajectory. It's impossible to address all of one's desires in one piece, so a series allows the maker to try theme and variation. Some series are short lived, but I return to others in one way or another for years.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy? I enjoy drawing, especially from a live model, but recently I bought a fixer-upper house and have been spending all my creative energies working on it. Of course, pretty and intriguing images on Pinterest and Instagram always feed me as well.

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Artist Profile: Karol Kusmaul

Karol Kusmaul
Inverness, Florida
1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you?  I enjoyed this theme, gathering and playing with personal symbols and items meaningful to me.  My piece was challenging because of the varied materials used, and the thickness of the layers I had to hand stitch through. Also challenging was the fact that I only gave myself a few days to get all the applique and hand quilting finished.  Even though I knew about the theme and deadline for a year.  Mea culpa.
2. Describe your studio space? I am so fortunate to have a separate building next to my home.  Skylights, kitchen, bathroom, office space, and a pool – it would make a super mother in law house.  I have room for my 12 foot APQS Millennium.  Hubby wants to downsize, but I’m digging in my heels.
3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? I’ve formed an online international fiber artist group at:  https://www.clothincommon.com   and my website: http://www.kquilt.com and blog:  http://kquilt.blogspot.com/
4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist?  I’ve done series of portraits, figures, still life and landscapes.  The benefits include having work to exhibit, having plenty of teaching samples, working to achieve variety, and having work that plays (or shows) well together.  I also did a series of Journal quilts, which was good, because I had committed to make one a month.  The challenges: getting too comfortable and not wanting to venture elsewhere, not getting stuck in a  rut where your work is predictable.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy?  Anywhere I go, my creative energy is fed.  A ballgame, a visit to my dad’s assisted living facility, yoga class, vacation trips, church, a bike ride, even mowing the grass is good meditative time.  I so enjoy the visual treats that are everywhere.

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Artist Profile: Lyric Montgomery Kinard

Lyric Montgomery Kinard
Cary, North Carolina

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you?  This was the easiest theme I’ve encountered so far and as soon as it was announced I had ideas in my head that quickly coalesced into a work. I’ve been working enough recently that I’ve settled into a current set of images and shapes and lines that speak to me as an artist. They are abstract to begin with and endlessly challenging. They have enough variety that I am still enthused and curious about where each new variation might take me.

2. Describe your studio space. Short story? Crowded. Long story? Right now it is more unmanageable than usual. I am in the process of moving from the small (about 16’ x 16’) ground floor room I’ve worked in for the past 16 years into the third floor walk-up attic. All of my inventory from up there is currently down here. So I’m dodging boxes and piles and sorting through bins of stuff to get rid of before I have to haul it all back up two flights of stairs.

3. Where can people see your work in the next six months. I am not going to be showing widely for most of 2018 as I concentrate on getting my new studio set up, get my current teenager graduated and out of the nest, and developing a new series of work. You can always follow my doings at www.LyricKinard.com to see if I get anything out there.

4. Do you ever work in a series? If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? I absolutely love working in a series! My Personal Iconography piece is a continues exploration of circles and grids, sometimes broken, sometimes whole. Each finished piece leaves me with design questions to be answered in the next piece. It also leaves me with a pile of scraps and materials that often inspire just one more iteration of an idea. I do get bored easily - so my series are rarely created in a linear fashion. I’ll jump back and forth between a representational series and an abstract manner of working to keep myself engaged and interested. A series might run for years with a work added to it only once a year - but eventually it creates a body of cohesive work.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy? I love watching science shows. I read fantasy and sci-fi literature for pure escapism. I garden now and then.  I especially love teaching and travel. The quilt world has allowed me to go new places, meet new people, and see new things while sharing what I love! I am as energized by helping a student to find their creative spark as I am by being in the studio.

Monday, August 28, 2017

Artist Profile: Susie Monday

Susie Monday
Pipe Creek, Texas

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you?  For a change, this theme presented little challenge as an idea but technical challenges to my hand.  Because I immediately saw how I could cut up an earlier piece that appeared in a Dinner @ Eight exhibit I had to figure out the best way to reassemble it. I ended up using my own version of a Boro running stitch to both re-quilt the piece by hand and to reassemble the different elements including new patches.

2. Describe your studio space?  I work in the studio of my dreams: a converted two car garage with a giant design table in the middle. I walk to work across the driveway and look out at the beautiful Texas Hill Country through the windows in the front. My wife retired this spring, so we have a lot of travel on the  calendar this year. Some of my studio time is spent with traveling art, small sections of hand stitch.
3. Where can people see your work in the next six months?  I hope to have a piece in the local Fiber Artists of San Antonio exhibit, I currently have a piece in Form, not Function and, of course, with all of you at the international festival! This is been a half year of experimentation and exploration, working more abstractly than I have in the past, so I'm just now getting some pieces finished to submit to exhibits.
4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? I tend to work in a number of series all at once. Go figure. Some of the work I do refers back to series of work that I completed three or four or even five years ago. 

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy?
We just added a little river cabin to our (small) collection of Airbnb properties, so it seems I'm spending a lot of time, creatively, with chopping Prickly Pear cactus, stalking the thrift stores for furnishings, and a paint roller in the hand. but the kayak early in the morning makes it all worthwhile.

Friday, August 25, 2017

Artist Profile: Sue Bleiweiss

Sue Bleiweiss
Pepperell, Massachusetts

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you?  I struggled with the theme at first and spent many hours working through different ways to approach it in my sketchbook.  My original thought was to create a piece that played on the word graffiti but I just couldn’t get anything to come together.  Once I stopped focussing on the word graffiti to drive the content of the quilt the idea for Work In Progress came together quite quickly. I started with a few small rough sketches and then once I had a good vision for what I wanted it to look like, I drew it full scale. 

2. Describe your studio space?  My studio is on the third floor of my home.  It's about 500 square feet - one side is my office and the other has my sewing machine, workstation, ironing station and all my supplies.  It’s a well lit space with a window at each end and two skylights so I get a good amount of natural light.  I have a separate wet studio in the basement where I do all my fabric dyeing.

3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? I have several pieces on display at the Brigham City Museum in Brigham City UT.  You can also see my Inside Out quilt on display at the Houston International Quilt Festival in the Modern Quilt Showcase and in the traveling exhibit 'Threads of Resistance.'

4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? A good portion of my body of work is part of a series.  Working in a series helps you avoid those painful “what do I do next” slumps that we all fall into at some point.  It helps you circumvent those moments because it gives you the answer to the what’s next question.  I have a sketchbook filled with pages of ideas for quilts in my tutti frutti series so if I’m not sure what to do next I review my notes, an idea is sparked and I’m off and creating again.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy?  I live on the East Coast so I spend a lot of time outdoors in the warmer months enjoying the break from the colder winter months when there is snow and ice on the ground.  My husband and I spend a lot of time canoeing and hiking and I always have my camera with me.  Birds are one of my favorite subjects to photograph and the river that we live along provides me with lots of subject matter. 

Thursday, August 24, 2017

Artist Profile: Terry Grant

Terry Grant
Portland, Oregon


1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? To choose a beautiful, appealing subject that I could render using all my favorite, personal marks, symbols, and techniques on. I wanted something that is recognizable and would demonstrate that even a common, universal image becomes personal when it takes on an artist's personal visual language.
2. Describe your studio space? I am fortunate to have a small studio, built just for me, in a wooded area just steps from my house. It is filled with light and I am surrounded by my fabrics and tools. There is a small loft upstairs, with storage and guest space.
3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? I am very excited that one of my pieces is part of the SAQA Concrete and Grasslands exhibit that will be at the 9th Asia Quilt Festival, Shanghai, China: September 22 - 24, 2017. I also hope to have work in the local Beaverton Arts Mix in September and will have my studio open for the Washington County Open Studio tour, October 14-15

4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? I have several series that are ongoing. Each gives me an opportunity to explore a theme or concept in depth and pushes me to continue to see things in new ways. I love it when my "series" suddenly overlap or intersect—always an exciting surprise and evidence that our brains are constantly working behind the scenes, making connections that we aren't even aware of!

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy? I started knitting a couple years ago, and am learning bookbinding techniques, but I find that travel is the thing that most feeds that creative urge. Creativity is part of every culture and seeing that universal love of color and design is so inspiring. We are currently planning a trip to Morocco and even just looking at photos and reading about it is giving me new ideas!

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Artist Profile: Frances Holliday Alford

Frances Holliday Alford
Grafton, Vermont


1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you?  I had to think about this theme for a long time.  I had been developing a class with a similar subject, personal symbols.  The addition of graffiti made the whole theme so much more interesting...but it also required a deeper excavation into myself.

2. Describe your studio space?  I have the whole third floor of my house and an elevator to get there.  There is running water in a deep sink and a Kurig Coffee Maker and a small refrigerator.  I have covered insulation board on several walls for designing. The floor is 12 inch black and white checkered tiles which are great for measuring.   Because it is an attic, I regret that there are not more full sized walls.  I also use my basement for wet work.  There is a big double sink, several long tables, a washer and dryer for dying cloth and a cement floor.

3. Where can people see your work in the next six months?  You can always come by my house.  Drop by any time and I will be happy to show you.  I do not expect to have anything on display before the Quilt Festival in Houston.

4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist?  I love working in series.  If it is something that I feel is successful, I will return to it again even after a series feels complete.  Currently, I am most excited about the texture that happens from washing and drying quilted fabrics along the way.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy?  Travel seems to be the most fertile way to feed my creativity.  I like to take a lot of photos, to write and also to work along the way.  I also find that working with other artists in regularly scheduled activities is very important.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Artist Profile: Susan Fletcher King

Susan Fletcher King
Houston, Texas

1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you?  For once, I had too many ideas!  It took me far too long to settle on just one idea and even then, I couldn’t resist and changed and changed again!
2. Describe your studio space?  My studio is very small.  I have compared it to being inside a space capsule.  I tend to work on multiple projects at one time so this small studio space gets very cluttered.  From time to time I have to shovel things out and start fresh.
3. Where can people see your work in the next six months?  My work will be shown at Quilt Festival this year.
4. Do you ever work in a series?  Funny you should ask!  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist?  I realized that my current D@8 piece is my subconscious telling me to work with particular imagery and explore those images.  I am now consciously exploring series work in a few different ways.  This is a very rewarding process since it pushes me past the obvious solutions and into uncharted waters.  This can be a painful process but growth is never without some discomfort.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy?  There are many things that feed me, not all of which seem creative on the surface.  Many times, mundane or repetitive tasks (like folding laundry) allow me to become meditative and my creative mind steps in and the design ideas start flowing.

Monday, August 21, 2017

Artist Profile: Martha Wolfe

Martha Wolfe
Davis, California


1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? This was a pretty accessible theme for me as I focussed on "artistic expression based on personal style". I have several recurring images in my work, and seabirds are probably the most common. From a distance, the flock appears to be a lot of the same bird - but as you look closer, personalities emerge, individuals. No two are the same. Each has a story.
2. Describe your studio space? Currently, cluttered….but in general, it’s a bright space, with a shelf unit along one wall, filled with my favorite things - fabric, books, pictures and memorabilia. Another wall is a design wall. My cutting table and computer desk are on cinderblocks so I can do most activities standing (which is great), with the exception of actually machine sewing. There's music and podcasts and friendly cats. It is my portal to peace these days.


3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? My work can be seen in the NorCA/NV SAQA “Strata” exhibit at the Pence Gallery in Davis, CA; NorCA/NV and CT SAQA “Local Color” exhibit at the Slater Memorial Museum in Norwich, CT; NM SAQA “Natural Healing” exhibit at various locations - currently at the Inova Cancer Center in Fairfax, VA; Global SAQA exhibit “H2Oh” at various locations - currently at the National Quilt Museum in Paducah, KY; Artist Circle Alliance’s “Threads of Resistance” exhibit at various locations - currently New England Quilt Museum in Lowell, MA; Viewpoints 9: Word exhibit at IQM/IQF in Houston, TX; and, of course, Dinner @ 8. 

4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? While I don’t feel I work in a series, I do have certain imagery with personal significance that frequently inspires my work - birds, fish, bicycles, to name a few. Consequently, people associate them with my work, which can be both positive and negative - I never want to be limited to these subjects.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy? Photography feeds my creative energy, capturing new things when I travel, or using a macro in my back yard. Beyond that, printmaking, visiting museums and exhibitions, and talking with friends that share my passions, all feed my creative spirit and keep me imagining what is next. Confession: I deliberately shy away from new endeavors, like knitting and painting and glass-blowing and all those other things that beckon…...I haven’t enough time as it is.

Friday, August 18, 2017

Artist Profile: Sherri Lipman McCauley

Sherri Lipman McCauley
Lakeway, TX


2. Describe your studio space? My studio is a large room off my kitchen, with a glorious door that can be closed to hold in the creative chaos. Sewing tables, a cutting table, ironing board, and design wall take up the floor space. Way too many yards of fabric, spools of thread and sewing tools cover most of the surfaces. I try to keep my paints and dyes corralled on shelves and in drawers. My view out the window is of Lake Travis, and it is just glorious!
3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? My first solo show, Painted Threads, will be coming down at my local library, Lake Travis Community Library in Lakeway, Texas at the end of July. Early in August, I will be hanging a solo show, Threaded Journeys, at the Austin International Bergstrom Airport in Austin, Texas. I will have a piece hanging at the Whistler House Museum of Art in Lowell, Contemporary Art Quilts 2017, Massachusetts August 5-September 1, 2017 and Visions Art Museum, Interpretations: Conversations, October 21, 2017 - January 7, 2018 in San Diego, California.

4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? Yes. Locating the same materials to use in the series is sometimes a challenge. I have been working intermittingly on painted cloth with gentle lines of stitching, adding a touch of color. This has given me an opportunity to explore different types of paint and methods of application. The testing of new techniques is an exciting aspect of working in a series. Just by changing one element, the entire focus can be shifted, yet all pieces are related.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy? I like to enter local shows and take photographs of interesting trees and plants. I like to think that these photos will become a part of an upcoming series. Getting together with like-minded art friends also feeds my soul.

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Artist Profile: Judy Coates Perez

Judy Coates Perez
Sacramento, California


1. What kind of challenges did this theme present to you? None, I just thought about the types of imagery that inspire me and pulled out a photo from my iPhone that I loved.
2. Describe your studio space? Chaos? Its a large room off the back of my house with a 4’ x 8’ work table in the center and shelves around the sides that never have enough room given how many different types of supplies I keep on hand for teaching.
3. Where can people see your work in the next six months? I have a quilt traveling with the Threads of Resistance exhibit, other than that online on my website or my Facebook page or Instagram.
4. Do you ever work in a series?  If so, what benefits or challenges does this present to you as an artist? Not intentionally, but I suppose it happens at times.

5. What other activities do you engage in that “feed” your creative energy? I go to galleries and museums and see other types of art, I love spending times in nature or all kinds and am never with out my iPhone ready to photograph things that I see. My archive of photos are a great source of visual imagery for me to work from.
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