Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Artist Profile: Victoria Findlay Wolfe

Victoria Findlay Wolfe
New York, New York
http://www.bumblebeansinc.com/ 



1.  Describe your signature style in 5 words:
​  Scrappy , tradition with artful twists
 


2.  Do you ever work in another medium and, if so, what is it and what appeals to you about it?   ​ I'm trained as a painter, although these days, Fabrics are my paint. My paints have all been put away, as fabric holds my attention the best and is less smelly. haha.​ My camera is always attached to me, I need to be bale to snap a memory. I don't like forgetting....anything.


3.  What's coming up for you in your artistic world?  I have 12 D
ouble wedding ring
 quilts, 5 star quilts and three 
​o​
f my grandmother, Elda Wolfe's quilts on exhibit at the Wisconsin Museum of Quilts & Fiber Arts June 25-October 24th, 2015. Traditions Made Modern: 12 Double Wedding Rings, "Full Circle" sketches from life by Victoria Findlay Wolfe.  March -June
 ​ 2015,​
 I have an
​other​
 exhibit of the Double 
​W​
edding 
R​
ings at the 
​ International Quilt Study Center & Museum.

I'll be teaching at ​
​Quiltcon! See you in Texas!  A new book releasing in January,


4.  Do you have any studio rituals? ​Not really, only that I spend hours on end in my studio....​and I may or may not have a secret stash of Jolly ranchers and chocolate on it's own special shelf....

5.  Who has inspired you on your artistic journey? 
 ​ 
My grandmother, is my biggest influencer.
​ Her quilts, instilled color, and pattern in me at a young age. She didn't need patterns to make her beauties... she found joy in the fabrics she had, even if they were polyester! Also,​ Inspired by 
 
​al
l the quilters who came before me. I'm always looking to see where they took liberties, inserting their personalities into the quilt...​ where they tried something new, and just went with it. 
 ​Creative freedom!​

6.  What are the 5 essential things in your studio that you cannot live without?
 ​ my Juki TL2010 Q​ machines... fabric, of course... toothpicks, sharpies, and my havels seam ripper...

7.  What is on your design table right now?  A huge mess. 
​ A mountain of SOLIDS, about 30 different colors... and fabrics from my last project that hasn't been put away yet... Very little space left for cutting. 

8.  How do you juggle your artistic life, family, friends, etc?   Very good question...I am constantly reevaluating what I am doing 
​to balance
 
​quilting and family. Well, not balance really, tip the scales towards family... Family is numero uno.


9.  Do you have any studio companions (human or otherwise)? In my new studio, I can't have any pets... If I am at home in my classroom studio, my furrbeasts, 
​(​
dogs,
​)​
 Jenny Egg and Kia
​,​
 are always in my scrap bi
​n​
s or at my feet.
​ Sometimes my daughter comes over and scoots around on my chairs with wheels. I do that too.​ Like mother like daughter...


10.  What was the biggest challenge in creating your piece for Reflections? 
​Working out the design and proportions, and ​p
iecing the full 
​ovals
 was a challenge... But I didn't want to do a quilt without there being a good challenge involved. Each piece of multi colored fabric holds a memory, and all the red ones are memories yet to be made.... I like that the red gets to be more and more the further out it goes... I have so much more to do and reflect on.

Monday, July 28, 2014

Artist Profile: Diane Rusin Doran

Diane Rusin Doran
Glenelg, MD

1.  Describe your signature style in 5 words: colorful, luminous, detailed, layered, surrealistic

2.  Do you ever work in another medium and, if so, what is it and what appeals to you about it? Photography, which goes hand in hand with my quilts, because I love capturing the moment.

3.  What's coming up for you in your artistic world? I have many quilts designed and am hoping to find the time to create them and enter some new to me venues.

4.  Do you have any studio rituals? I tell myself “I think I can” when I begin.

5.  Who has inspired you on your artistic journey? My grandmother, Esther Hepler Ingelsby, who worked in many mediums but especially water colors and oils.

6.  What are the 5 essential things in your studio that you cannot live without? Great lighting, a large table with the machine inset in it, my trusty Bernina 1130, a self-threading needle

7.  What is on your design table right now? Several experimental pieces.

8.  How do you juggle your artistic life, family, friends, etc?  My art usually takes a back seat to my other responsibilities. However, once I commit to myself to meet a deadline I make it a personal priority. 

9.  Do you have any studio companions (human or otherwise)? Occasionally one of my three sons.

10.  What was the biggest challenge in creating your piece for Reflections? I first designed a very complex piece, then at the last minute decided I wasn’t going to enjoy quilting it so designed another instead.

Sunday, July 27, 2014

Artist Profile: Linda Frost

Linda Frost
Lawrence, Kansas

1.  Describe your signature style in 5 words:
Hope this makes someone smile.

2.  Do you ever work in another medium and, if so, what is it and what appeals to you about it? I also like to crochet, which is another medium that lends itself to using bits and scraps.


3.  What's coming up for you in your artistic world? I just had my second book "Robots in Space!" published and I am considering whether or not to write a third quilt book.

4.  Do you have any studio rituals? When I enter my studio I try to get the sewing machine going as fast as possible. Otherwise I spend too much time just dithering.

5.  Who has inspired you on your artistic journey? The classes I took with Nancy Crow, Ruth McDowell, Ann Johnston and Jane Dunnewold gave me the tools to dye and piece just about anything.



6.  What are the 5 essential things in your studio that you cannot live without? Sewing machine, rotary cutter, design wall, freezer paper, thread/fabric

7.  What is on your design table right now? Donation quilts for a local Headstart preschool class.

8.  How do you juggle your artistic life, family, friends, etc?  Time needed for artistic efforts nearly always conflicts with family life. My only hope is that when I drop a ball it does not roll too far away.

9.  Do you have any studio companions (human or otherwise)? I have three Amazon parrots and one conure, but they live in a sunroom with a view. No self respecting parrot would spend time in a basement studio that is also known as the sewing dungeon.

10.  What was the biggest challenge in creating your piece for Reflections? Sewing to a set size is a challenge for me. Most of my quilts want to be the size they want to be and are resistant to my size suggestions.

Friday, July 25, 2014

Artist Profile: Sarah Ann Smith

Sarah Ann Smith
Hope, Maine

1.  Describe your signature style in 5 words:  Collaged, thread-colored and quilted.    

2.  Do you ever work in another medium and, if so, what is it and what appeals to you about it?  I’m learning to draw and sketch better, including watercolor and mixed media. It’s faster than textile art, and I like the fact that I know I usually won’t be showing this work, so I can mess around and play. 

3.  What’s coming up for you in your artistic world?  I hope to actually make more artwork, not just samples for teaching or articles!  I’ve written a number of articles for Machine Quilting Unlimited this past year, have two projects that will be in Quilting Arts Gifts 2014, and have three episodes in Quilting Arts TV Series 1400! I’ve also got work in three just or soon-to-be-published books: Lesley Riley’s Inspirational Quotes Illustrated (watercolor lettering), Dare to Dance by Mary W. Kerr, and Inspired by the Beatles by Donna DeSoto (art quilts).  I’m teaching again at International Quilt Festival in Houston and the following year at Vermont Quilt Festival and Maine Quilts among other venues.  Finally, I’ll be curating my first exhibit, Food! for SAQA (Studio Art Quilt Associates) with entries due in September 2014.   I might even get a quilt made to enter in that one!

4.  Do you have any studio rituals?  No.  Maybe I should have some!  Unless of course a tidy attack at the end of a project counts, but that has more to do with finding the surface of the table and not being able to work in utter chaos.

5.  Who has inspired you on your artistic journey?  Ooof…. and keep the answer short?   Vincent Van Gogh. Henri Matisse. Hollis Chatelain. My friend Kathy Daniels.  J.R.R. Tolkien.  Auguste Rodin. David Hockney.  Mary Doria Russell.  Stephen King and Twyla Tharp.  Albrecht Durer.  The ancient cave painters and the goldsmiths of Sutton Hoo.  Legions of sketchers and artists. My sons. 

6.  What are the 5 essential things in your studio that you cannot live without?  My Janome sewing machine, thread, MistyFuse, titanium nonstick iron, wide paper to make a full-size sketch (have rolls that are 48 and 60 inches!), design wall, and (sigh) seam ripper.  And yes, I use creative counting.  Off to Platform 9 3/4. 

7.  What is on your design table right now?  A practice project, as I have a complicated new sewing machine and need to develop a good working relationship with it!  

8.  How do you juggle your artistic life, family, friends, etc?   I don’t know that I juggle it well at all.  Something always gets shorted.  As my kids are older now—our younger son is 16—I have more time in some ways, but am still happy to be the mom-taxi.  I figure all too soon he will be in college, I will miss him immensely, and I’ll have to develop a routine where I don’t fritter away time on the laptop!

9.  Do you have any studio companions (human or otherwise)?  We have four cats and a pug.  Our calico, Thumper, and the pug, Pigwidgeon, are my wake-up crew and follow-critters.  They have species-identity issues.  The cat comes when called and is alongside the dog to greet me at the front door.  The dog sits on windowsills like a cat.   Sweetly confused!

10.  What was the biggest challenge in creating your piece for Reflections?  This piece, like a number of my works, is a hybrid of several images, so getting the middle-ground to mesh well with the main figure, ground and distant woods took a couple attempts.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Artist Profile: Carolyn Ryan

Carolyn Ryan
Thousand Oaks, CA

1.  Describe your signature style in 5 words: mood, strong lines, threadwork, originality
 
2.  Do you ever work in another medium and, if so, what is it and what appeals to you about it? Printmaking is a great way to generate ideas which cross over into textile pieces. It requires patience, many tools, which I love, and acceptance of failures. The payoff is the moment when a good print rolls out onto the print bed!
 
3.  What's coming up for you in your artistic world? I enter several fine art shows locally each year, so I try to plan my smaller pieces for those shows. I’m debating whether I should try to get juried in to the LA Art Association, where I might find and learn from some cutting edge artists. I currently have 2 large pieces in the local Hillcrest Center for the Arts. 
 
4.  Do you have any studio rituals? Yes – my newest one is – I bought two clear plastic, over-door shoe holders (20 slots, I think), and I now have my 20 key tools at hand at all times for easy access. All my scraps and small studies go into the second one.  My rule is, I must have all my tools back in the pockets before I can begin work. Otherwise I waste lots of time searching, especially if I can’t find my glasses.
 
5.  Who has inspired you on your artistic journey? I have 7 really fine artist friends who meet regularly to share dinner and discuss our current artwork and roadblocks. These friends are both critics and supporters, and I am always amazed and inspired by the originality of their art.
 
6.  What are the 5 essential things in your studio that you cannot live without? Rotary cutter and mats, artist pens, binders full of ideas, fusibles and iron/board.
 
7.  What is on your design table right now? A series of portraits rendered with painted fusible and heavy watercolor paper. I’m experimenting with adding texture.
 
8.  How do you juggle your artistic life, family, friends, etc?  I am retired, and feel I have earned my freedom. I make a to do list every morning, and this takes the anxiety out of my day, and allows me the freedom to get into my creative inner world. Sometimes it takes awhile!
 
9.  Do you have any studio companions (human or otherwise)? No – I love my solitude, especially on a foggy day.
 
10.  What was the biggest challenge in creating your piece for Reflections? Making my composition fit the size requirement. The vertical format forces me to trim down to just the essential elements, and to set aside the frustration of not being able to include all the compositional ideas I want.

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Artist Profile: Sue Bleiweiss

Sue Bleiweiss
Pepperell MA
www.suebleiweiss.com   www.suebleiweiss.com/blog


1.  Describe your signature style in 5 words: whimsical, colorful, bright, fun, happy

2.  Do you ever work in another medium and, if so, what is it and what appeals to you about it? nope, fabric is my favorite and only medium!

3.  What's coming up for you in your artistic world?  I have a new book coming out in April 2015 that I’m really excited about.  It’s a project based book filled with art quilt, home dec and personal accessory projects.

4.  Do you have any studio rituals? I always clean up after finishing one project before I start another and I almost always only work on one project at a time.

5.  Who has inspired you on your artistic journey?  When I first started I was inspired by the work of Jan Beany, Jean Littlejohn, Jane Dunnewold, Maggie Grey, Janet Edmonds and Cas Holmes.  Now that I have refined my techniques and found my my own artistic voice I am inspired by the work of Dale Chihuly, Kandinsky, Klee, Matisse, Miro and Braque to name a few.

6.  What are the 5 essential things in your studio that you cannot live without? Mistyfuse, my BERNINA 750 QE, my iron, tracing paper and brown kraft paper

7.  What is on your design table right now? a huge pile of fabric scraps left over from a large quilt that I’m working on called Tutti Frutti Main Street II

8.  How do you juggle your artistic life, family, friends, etc?  I don’t over commit myself!  I keep a tight rein on my calendar and I learned many years ago the importance of saying no so that I don’t end up with too much to do and not enough time to do it all in.

9.  Do you have any studio companions (human or otherwise)?  I have two dogs: a cocker spaniel named Nina and a shepherd/lab mix named Sherry.  Both came from local rescue organizations.

10.  What was the biggest challenge in creating your piece for Reflections?  My biggest challenge was trying to get it done before I went in for shoulder surgery!

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Artist Profile: Barb Forrister

Barb Forrister
Austin, Texas


1.  Describe your signature style in 5 words: Painterly, Dimensional, Colorful, Nature Inspired. 

2.  Do you ever work in another medium and, if so, what is it and what appeals to you about it? I love working in Mixed Media because there are so many options to accomplish what I mean to convey! The possibilities are endless.

3.  What's coming up for you in your artistic world? I have been invited as a guest artist on a new and upcoming book on fusibles. I also have been working with a new production team here in Austin called Fiddler on the Roof where my work will be featured as part of the set design. How exciting is that? 

4.  Do you have any studio rituals? Not really, I like to be free to design and create so it depends what is happening at the moment.

5.  Who has inspired you on your artistic journey? Some of my favorite artists include Patricia Gould, Betty Busby, Ginny Eckley, Pamela Allen and David Taylor. 

6.  What are the 5 essential things in your studio that you cannot live without? Wow, only five? Ok, here goes: fabric, paint/brushes, thread, scissors and my sewing machine.

7.  What is on your design table right now? Right now, I am finishing up a group collaboration with 7 artists including Sherri McCauley, Martha Tsihlas, Kathy York, Leslie Tucker Jenison, Connie Conley Hudson, Frances Holliday Alford and myself. This piece is a bold, graphic, black and white, modern quilt with very subtle traces of chartreuse and cobalt blue. It is the first time that we have ever created anything like this and I am so jazzed about the way it has turned out. 
 
8.  How do you juggle your artistic life, family, friends, etc?  I am pretty flexible but I like to keep a schedule so that I am focused on tasks. I work in the studio on weekdays. Evenings and weekends are free for family and friends unless I am under the gun with a deadline! I also teach Surface Design and Mixed Media Art Cloth on Tuesday evenings at the Dougherty Art Center in Austin, Texas. 

9.  Do you have any studio companions (human or otherwise)? Not really but my family and our dog pop in every now and then to see what is going on.  

10.  What was the biggest challenge in creating your piece for Reflections? The format (24X60) is always hard in terms of what looks good in that size but this time around, I had a difficult time with the theme. I kept vacillating on whether to be literal with actual reflections or conceptual. In the end, I opted for conceptual!
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